Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Name Information
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston 01083
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston Needless to say the news of his death has caused genuine regret amongst his old comrades at Upperlands. The sympathy of the entire neighbourhood is with the sorrowing family in their irreparable loss. Two brothers of the late officer are also serving King and country – Lieutenant Gerald D Houston, Royal Irish Rifles, and Corporal Thomas H Houston, Inniskillings.
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston Lieutenant Houston, who was only about 24 years of age, was the fifth son of Mr Thomas Houston, Summerhill, Maghera. He volunteered in September 1914 with the first contingent of men from the district, joining the Derry Battalion. He took part in many of the big battles on the western front, and was wounded during the heroic charge of the Ulstermen on 1st July 1916, and on recovering, he again returned to the scene of action. He soon attained the rank of corporal, and later he was selected for a course of training. In August last he received his commission, and had he been spared, gave every promise of a brilliant career in the army. Before enlisting he was employed on the clerical staff of Messrs William Clark & Son, Upperlands, where he was highly esteemed by both employers and employees. He was a keen athlete, and was one of the best footballers in South Derry. He was also deeply religious, and was altogether an ideal man.
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston ‘Both as an N.C.O. and an officer he always did his duty like a man. So far as I can gather, he lost his life in trying to save a wounded brother officer who afterwards died of wounds.’
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston Rev J G Paton, Coleraine, at present Chaplain to the Forces, in a touching letter, says:-
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston ‘I am more than sorry to have to write to tell you that your son was killed in action on the 26th March. He was at the time gallantly defending a section of trench against enemy attack. I cannot tell you how sorry I am to have lost him. He was a splendid officer, and one I could always trust.’
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston Lieutenant A O Houston, Royal Inniskillings, fifth son of Mr Thomas Houston, Summerhill, Maghera, killed in action on the 26th March. Lieutenant Colonel J Peacock, in the course of a letter of condolence to the deceased’s father says:-
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston 01082
13/01/2019 2nd Lieut Arthur Oswald Houston From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 13th April 1918: Lieutenant A O Houston
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Inserted by a sorrowing friend.
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Hope points to the skies and my sorrows control.’
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry My love and affection for thee cannot perish,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Though wide stormy oceans between us now roll,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry I love thee in life, and thy memory I cherish,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry I never can forget.
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Until my heart will cease to beat,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Shall often bring regret,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry The fond remembrance of the past,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry Never more to part again.
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry And someday we’ll be united,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry But in my heart will there remain,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry ‘Only in form we both are parted,
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry HENRY – Killed in action in France, Private Bob Henry, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry 01081
12/01/2019 Pte. Robert Henry From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th April 1918:
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Ever remembered by his sorrowing sister, Teanie.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. And the victor’s crown have won.'
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. With a true brave heart you did your part,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. That you would never return
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. We little thought when you went away,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Are closed in death’s cold chill.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. And the lips that spoke so kind to me,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. The fond true heart is still,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. 'His loving face and kindly smile
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing father, mother, sisters and brothers, Boyne Row, Castledawson.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Never to part again.'
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. To clasp his hand in a better land,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Someday, we know not when,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Some day we hope to meet him,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. In his presence to appear.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. It pleased the Lord to bid him come,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Not thinking death was near,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. ‘In health and strength he left his home,
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. HARTE – In loving memory of our dear son, Private Jack Harte, royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who died of wounds on 22nd March 1918.
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. 01080
12/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th April 1918:
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. Mr and Mrs Marshall have four other sons who likewise volunteered for service of their King and country on the outbreak of the war. One was badly wounded in France in the early stage of the war, and two were engaged in Palestine operations, one of whom was recently severely wounded and is now in hospital in Alexandria.
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. While the motion was being put, many of the audience were visibly moved with emotion. The resolution, which was requested to be forwarded to the family, was passed by the entire congregation standing in profound silence, after which the pastor commended the stricken ones to the God of all comfort and consolation, in earnest fervent prayer.
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. A comforting letter was read from the Captain of his Company to the parents, and in it he was spoken of as a ‘very gallant soldier and a fine Christian gentleman’, for whom awaited further decorations and honours, as well as prospects of promotion to commissioned rank had his life been spared. The thoughtfulness and kind disposition of the lad were also revealed by a letter received recently from him by an honoured and aged member of the church, in which he sympathised with her in her changed circumstances, and recalled the many pleasant and happy days which he and his brothers spent in their boyhood under her hospitable roof. Mr Henderson said the parents present were in a position to know something of the nature of the crushing blow which had fallen upon the Marshall family, and he was sure that all their hearts went out in deepest sympathy with them in their sore bereavement, and that their united prayer was that God would help them to bear their sad and irreparable loss. There was one bright ray of light breaking through the otherwise impenetrable dark cloud and that was the one they all mourned was present with the Lord, which for him was very far better than the blood drenched fields of France.
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. On the 17th March, at the morning service of the Baptist Church, Tobermore, the pastor, the Rev David Henderson, moved a resolution of sympathy with the Rev George and Mrs Marshall and family, in their sad bereavement, by the sudden home-call of their son, Private Robert Douglas Marshall, M.M., of the Cheshire Regiment who met his death while on patrol duty in ‘No Man’s Land’ by the bursting of a shell, which instantly killed the brave lad of the family which is so closely and almost indissolubly connected with the church here. Mr Henderson alluded to the painful occurrence as a personal loss to many of the congregation. The lad, he said, was born in Tobermore and brought up and nurtured in the very bosom of the church; he was a favourite in his own home, in the church and in the neighbourhood, where he was highly esteemed, and in many of the homes of the people he was regarded with almost as much affection as if he had been a member of the family.
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. Private Robert Douglas Marshall, killed in action in France on 28th February
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. 01079
09/01/2019 Pte. Robert Douglas Marshall M.M. From Mid Ulster Mail dated Saturday 23rd March 1918: Private Robert Douglas Marshall
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Private Harte distinguished himself on the previous day also, when the battalion was held up by an enemy machine gun, by rushing forward his Lewis gun and wiping out the death dealing obstruction. Lance Corporal Shanks is the same ‘Wee Billy’ who carried the message through the shell inferno of Thiepval Wood in March 1916, which probably saved the lives of hundreds, and which was ‘the talk of the whole Ulster Division at the time’, according to comrades who were there.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. From half past two until nearly five, the four of us held them up without receiving a scratch, and when the reinforcements came up later, from the Young Citizens, they had seven killed and a number wounded. They held the position for some time, but ultimately were driven out. We had only half a magazine left when we were relieved.’
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Just them McIlroy and Magill drew our attention to what was happening overhead. Talk about laughing! It just reminded us of sodding someone at home and dodging around a corner. There were the Germans bayonet charging the old lock house, ten yards above us to the right, thinking it held the main garrison.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. There was yet no sign of our reinforcements, and we knew from the sounds in the gully that the Germans had been reinforced. Jack rushed the Lewis gun to the mouth and let her rip just as they came out with an officer at their head. Back they went helter skelter and back came Jack out of direct range. Our ammunition was now almost exhausted, and we got off our packs preparatory to making a scoot for it when our last round had been fired.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Then along came another doubting Thomas in the shape of a young lieutenant, who persisted in walking backwards and forwards across the mouth of the gully to show us what he thought of our ‘yarn’. When the Germans did again show themselves he was so flabbergasted that he should stood and pointed his cane at them and then dropped, shot through the chest, dying later.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Private Grumbley, from Coleraine, who had lost his company, blundered along our way at a quiet moment, and we could not convince him that he was sitting at one of the early doors for the Kingdom Come, until the Germans made another rush down the gully and appeared almost at his side. The look of surprised incredulity on his face as he involuntarily brought up his rifle and banged into them, with a ‘Good ___ Billy’, was so ludicrous that I rolled over laughing, and for fully two minutes was unable to put a bullet in a rifle. He got wounded on the throat with a ricocheting bullet.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Imagine four of us dodging around that old canal bottom, chucking rifle grenades, rapid fire and Lewis gun fire at a force of the enemy who, if they had not thought us at least a hundred strong from the row we were keeping up, must have come out and eaten us up. We would dodge up to the mouth of the gully and rip up a few volleys and then back to our places, from where we slung over the grenades.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Going back into the bed of the canal, where we could command a view of the mouth of the gully, we built up a barricade of stones and put McIlroy behind it with the Lewis gun, and Magill beside him to fill magazines. Harte and I went forward, one on each side, to a depression in the embankment. To get at us in this position, the Germans had to expose themselves at the mouth of the gully, and when they did so we opened up and drove them back, each time with some casualties. You would scarcely believe it, but we never laughed so much in our lives.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. At this point there was a lock on the canal; surmounted by a ruined lock house and the canal, now a dry bed, had two branches separated by a high embankment. Jack and I jumped up on the embankment to peep over, and instantly a beetle bomb was thrown at us, but fortunately it buried itself in the bank. Connecting the main course of the canal with one of its branches was a deep gully and on looking up this, the officer perceived that it was full of Germans with a machine gun. Our officer, and the rest of our comrades, now rushed off to bring up reinforcements from the 14th Battalion (Y.C.V.’s) on our left, and as he said nothing to us four, we decided to stop where we were.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. We were quietly jogging along, says Lance corporal Shanks, with our rifles slung over our shoulders, and though we could hear the tick-tock of a German machine gun, it sounded so far away to our right we imagined the enemy were at least a mile away. Jack Harte was just in front of me, and he and I were laughing over something, when suddenly the officer jumped back from a corner in a trench we had reached, exclaiming as he ripped out his revolver:- ‘Look out boys! There’s a machine gun in action just around the corner.’
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. Here is the story of how four South Derry soldiers won the Military Medal during the Cambrai push in November last. The facts were related by Lance Corporal William Shanks and Lewis Gunner Jack Harte, two of the heroic four, and both natives of Castledawson. Their companions in the gallant exploit were Private Malcolm Magill (Magherafelt) and Lewis Gunner T McIlroy (Upperlands). On the day following the Cambrai battle these for formed part of a fighting patrol of fifteen, which included an officer. Their duty was to explore a large triangular area uncrossed by the British in the advance, and lying along the hollow of the Du Nord Canal.
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. 01078
09/01/2019 L/Corp Thomas McIlroy M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: South Derry Heroes – How They Won Military Crosses
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Private Harte distinguished himself on the previous day also, when the battalion was held up by an enemy machine gun, by rushing forward his Lewis gun and wiping out the death dealing obstruction. Lance Corporal Shanks is the same ‘Wee Billy’ who carried the message through the shell inferno of Thiepval Wood in March 1916, which probably saved the lives of hundreds, and which was ‘the talk of the whole Ulster Division at the time’, according to comrades who were there.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. From half past two until nearly five, the four of us held them up without receiving a scratch, and when the reinforcements came up later, from the Young Citizens, they had seven killed and a number wounded. They held the position for some time, but ultimately were driven out. We had only half a magazine left when we were relieved.’
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Just them McIlroy and Magill drew our attention to what was happening overhead. Talk about laughing! It just reminded us of sodding someone at home and dodging around a corner. There were the Germans bayonet charging the old lock house, ten yards above us to the right, thinking it held the main garrison.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. There was yet no sign of our reinforcements, and we knew from the sounds in the gully that the Germans had been reinforced. Jack rushed the Lewis gun to the mouth and let her rip just as they came out with an officer at their head. Back they went helter skelter and back came Jack out of direct range. Our ammunition was now almost exhausted, and we got off our packs preparatory to making a scoot for it when our last round had been fired.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Then along came another doubting Thomas in the shape of a young lieutenant, who persisted in walking backwards and forwards across the mouth of the gully to show us what he thought of our ‘yarn’. When the Germans did again show themselves he was so flabbergasted that he should stood and pointed his cane at them and then dropped, shot through the chest, dying later.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Private Grumbley, from Coleraine, who had lost his company, blundered along our way at a quiet moment, and we could not convince him that he was sitting at one of the early doors for the Kingdom Come, until the Germans made another rush down the gully and appeared almost at his side. The look of surprised incredulity on his face as he involuntarily brought up his rifle and banged into them, with a ‘Good ___ Billy’, was so ludicrous that I rolled over laughing, and for fully two minutes was unable to put a bullet in a rifle. He got wounded on the throat with a ricocheting bullet.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Imagine four of us dodging around that old canal bottom, chucking rifle grenades, rapid fire and Lewis gun fire at a force of the enemy who, if they had not thought us at least a hundred strong from the row we were keeping up, must have come out and eaten us up. We would dodge up to the mouth of the gully and rip up a few volleys and then back to our places, from where we slung over the grenades.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Going back into the bed of the canal, where we could command a view of the mouth of the gully, we built up a barricade of stones and put McIlroy behind it with the Lewis gun, and Magill beside him to fill magazines. Harte and I went forward, one on each side, to a depression in the embankment. To get at us in this position, the Germans had to expose themselves at the mouth of the gully, and when they did so we opened up and drove them back, each time with some casualties. You would scarcely believe it, but we never laughed so much in our lives.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. At this point there was a lock on the canal; surmounted by a ruined lock house and the canal, now a dry bed, had two branches separated by a high embankment. Jack and I jumped up on the embankment to peep over, and instantly a beetle bomb was thrown at us, but fortunately it buried itself in the bank. Connecting the main course of the canal with one of its branches was a deep gully and on looking up this, the officer perceived that it was full of Germans with a machine gun. Our officer, and the rest of our comrades, now rushed off to bring up reinforcements from the 14th Battalion (Y.C.V.’s) on our left, and as he said nothing to us four, we decided to stop where we were.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. We were quietly jogging along, says Lance corporal Shanks, with our rifles slung over our shoulders, and though we could hear the tick-tock of a German machine gun, it sounded so far away to our right we imagined the enemy were at least a mile away. Jack Harte was just in front of me, and he and I were laughing over something, when suddenly the officer jumped back from a corner in a trench we had reached, exclaiming as he ripped out his revolver:- ‘Look out boys! There’s a machine gun in action just around the corner.’
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. Here is the story of how four South Derry soldiers won the Military Medal during the Cambrai push in November last. The facts were related by Lance Corporal William Shanks and Lewis Gunner Jack Harte, two of the heroic four, and both natives of Castledawson. Their companions in the gallant exploit were Private Malcolm Magill (Magherafelt) and Lewis Gunner T McIlroy (Upperlands). On the day following the Cambrai battle these for formed part of a fighting patrol of fifteen, which included an officer. Their duty was to explore a large triangular area uncrossed by the British in the advance, and lying along the hollow of the Du Nord Canal.
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. 01078
09/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: South Derry Heroes – How They Won Military Crosses
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Private Harte distinguished himself on the previous day also, when the battalion was held up by an enemy machine gun, by rushing forward his Lewis gun and wiping out the death dealing obstruction. Lance Corporal Shanks is the same ‘Wee Billy’ who carried the message through the shell inferno of Thiepval Wood in March 1916, which probably saved the lives of hundreds, and which was ‘the talk of the whole Ulster Division at the time’, according to comrades who were there.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. From half past two until nearly five, the four of us held them up without receiving a scratch, and when the reinforcements came up later, from the Young Citizens, they had seven killed and a number wounded. They held the position for some time, but ultimately were driven out. We had only half a magazine left when we were relieved.’
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Just them McIlroy and Magill drew our attention to what was happening overhead. Talk about laughing! It just reminded us of sodding someone at home and dodging around a corner. There were the Germans bayonet charging the old lock house, ten yards above us to the right, thinking it held the main garrison.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. There was yet no sign of our reinforcements, and we knew from the sounds in the gully that the Germans had been reinforced. Jack rushed the Lewis gun to the mouth and let her rip just as they came out with an officer at their head. Back they went helter skelter and back came Jack out of direct range. Our ammunition was now almost exhausted, and we got off our packs preparatory to making a scoot for it when our last round had been fired.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Then along came another doubting Thomas in the shape of a young lieutenant, who persisted in walking backwards and forwards across the mouth of the gully to show us what he thought of our ‘yarn’. When the Germans did again show themselves he was so flabbergasted that he should stood and pointed his cane at them and then dropped, shot through the chest, dying later.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Private Grumbley, from Coleraine, who had lost his company, blundered along our way at a quiet moment, and we could not convince him that he was sitting at one of the early doors for the Kingdom Come, until the Germans made another rush down the gully and appeared almost at his side. The look of surprised incredulity on his face as he involuntarily brought up his rifle and banged into them, with a ‘Good ___ Billy’, was so ludicrous that I rolled over laughing, and for fully two minutes was unable to put a bullet in a rifle. He got wounded on the throat with a ricocheting bullet.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Imagine four of us dodging around that old canal bottom, chucking rifle grenades, rapid fire and Lewis gun fire at a force of the enemy who, if they had not thought us at least a hundred strong from the row we were keeping up, must have come out and eaten us up. We would dodge up to the mouth of the gully and rip up a few volleys and then back to our places, from where we slung over the grenades.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Going back into the bed of the canal, where we could command a view of the mouth of the gully, we built up a barricade of stones and put McIlroy behind it with the Lewis gun, and Magill beside him to fill magazines. Harte and I went forward, one on each side, to a depression in the embankment. To get at us in this position, the Germans had to expose themselves at the mouth of the gully, and when they did so we opened up and drove them back, each time with some casualties. You would scarcely believe it, but we never laughed so much in our lives.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. At this point there was a lock on the canal; surmounted by a ruined lock house and the canal, now a dry bed, had two branches separated by a high embankment. Jack and I jumped up on the embankment to peep over, and instantly a beetle bomb was thrown at us, but fortunately it buried itself in the bank. Connecting the main course of the canal with one of its branches was a deep gully and on looking up this, the officer perceived that it was full of Germans with a machine gun. Our officer, and the rest of our comrades, now rushed off to bring up reinforcements from the 14th Battalion (Y.C.V.’s) on our left, and as he said nothing to us four, we decided to stop where we were.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. We were quietly jogging along, says Lance corporal Shanks, with our rifles slung over our shoulders, and though we could hear the tick-tock of a German machine gun, it sounded so far away to our right we imagined the enemy were at least a mile away. Jack Harte was just in front of me, and he and I were laughing over something, when suddenly the officer jumped back from a corner in a trench we had reached, exclaiming as he ripped out his revolver:- ‘Look out boys! There’s a machine gun in action just around the corner.’
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. Here is the story of how four South Derry soldiers won the Military Medal during the Cambrai push in November last. The facts were related by Lance Corporal William Shanks and Lewis Gunner Jack Harte, two of the heroic four, and both natives of Castledawson. Their companions in the gallant exploit were Private Malcolm Magill (Magherafelt) and Lewis Gunner T McIlroy (Upperlands). On the day following the Cambrai battle these for formed part of a fighting patrol of fifteen, which included an officer. Their duty was to explore a large triangular area uncrossed by the British in the advance, and lying along the hollow of the Du Nord Canal.
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. 01078
09/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: South Derry Heroes – How They Won Military Crosses
08/01/2019 Pte. Allan McIvor ‘Father, In thy gracious keeping, leave we now our loved one sleeping.’
08/01/2019 Pte. Allan McIvor McIVOR – In loving memory of our darling son, Private Allan McIvor, 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskillings, who dies of pneumonia contracted on active service in France on 10th March 1916. Inserted by his parents, Ballynagowan, Desertmartin.
08/01/2019 Pte. Allan McIvor 01077
08/01/2019 Pte. Allan McIvor From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th March 1918:
06/01/2019 R/man William George A Flynn Mr W G Flynn, Upperlands, who was notified several months ago that his son, Lance Corporal W Flynn, Royal Irish Rifles, was missing, has now received official intimation that his son is believed to have been killed.
06/01/2019 R/man William George A Flynn 01076
06/01/2019 R/man William George A Flynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918:
06/01/2019 2nd Lieut David Paul Trooper Joshua Paul, North Irish Horse, Crewe, who was seriously wounded in the neck five months ago, and in hospital since then, is home on leave.
06/01/2019 2nd Lieut David Paul 01075
06/01/2019 2nd Lieut David Paul From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: Trooper Joshua Paul (brother of David Paul)
06/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. The following soldiers have been enjoying home leave:- Lance Corporal William Shanks, M.M.; Lance Corporal Bob Woods; Private Jack Harte, M.M.; Dan McCormack, Francis Hueston, John Anderson, Australians; George McCracken and James McKnight.
06/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. 01074
06/01/2019 Pte. John Jack Harte M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: Castledawson
06/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. The following soldiers have been enjoying home leave:- Lance Corporal William Shanks, M.M.; Lance Corporal Bob Woods; Private Jack Harte, M.M.; Dan McCormack, Francis Hueston, John Anderson, Australians; George McCracken and James McKnight.
06/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. 01074
06/01/2019 L/Corp William Shanks M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: Castledawson
06/01/2019 Pte. John Anderson The following soldiers have been enjoying home leave:- Lance Corporal William Shanks, M.M.; Lance Corporal Bob Woods; Private Jack Harte, M.M.; Dan McCormack, Francis Hueston, John Anderson, Australians; George McCracken and James McKnight.
06/01/2019 Pte. John Anderson 01074
06/01/2019 Pte. John Anderson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd March 1918: Castledawson
04/01/2019 Corp David Cushley Private David Cushley, Highland Light Infantry (son of Mr John Cushley, Upperlands) is home on leave.
04/01/2019 Corp David Cushley 01073
04/01/2019 Corp David Cushley From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 23rd February 1918: Upperlands
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell Private George R Bell, son of Mr Joseph Bell, Bellshill, Castledawson, Irish Guards, formerly of the R.I.C. and stationed at Lisburn, killed in action 21st January 1918.
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell 01072
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th February 1918: Private George R Bell
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell BELL – 21st January, Private George Bell, Irish Guards (former R.I.C. Constable stationed at Lisburn), killed in action in France, fifth son of Joseph Bell, Bellshill, Castledawson.
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell 01071
02/01/2019 Pte. George Reilly Bell From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd February 1918:
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